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natgeofound:

Roaring out of Auyan-Tepui’s wall, a waterfall plummets over 3,000 feet in Venezuela, March 1963.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Roaring out of Auyan-Tepui’s wall, a waterfall plummets over 3,000 feet in Venezuela, March 1963.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic

current state of humanity and the awakening

Lemon picking on my street 🍋

Lemon picking on my street 🍋

Blooming on my street🐝💞🌸

Blooming on my street🐝💞🌸

We Are Light

Set yourself free and remember that we are light beings, true liberation awaits…

I don’t think hip-hop so much reflects these violent neighborhoods, as it serves as therapy for the young boys who live in them. It offers a vicarious world where every puerile desire is instantly met. If you listen really closely to music, you will hear it pulsing with teenage insecurity and the angst of the youth. In hip-hop, young people are able to express sentiments and feelings, many of them negative, which they can’t really express elsewhere. Living, from the time you are born, with the threat of existential violence is stressful. Stress leads to anger and fear. We don’t generally express our anger and fear by saying, “I love the world” or “I pray for an end to world hunger.” Living around violence might make you say those things. But the stress of it more often will probably leave you with a string of curse words on your tongue. Moreover, it might even make you want to convert all of those negative feelings into a persona which can’t be killed by other males, which never feels rejection from females, and is generally free to engage all its hedonistic desires.
– Ta-Nehisi Coates (via iamhby)
uzowuru:

andre 3000

uzowuru:

andre 3000

(via iamhby)

beyonce:

Houston, Texas December 2013
Photographed by Rob Hoffman

beyonce:

Houston, Texas December 2013

Photographed by Rob Hoffman

natgeofound:

Roaring out of Auyan-Tepui’s wall, a waterfall plummets over 3,000 feet in Venezuela, March 1963.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic

natgeofound:

Roaring out of Auyan-Tepui’s wall, a waterfall plummets over 3,000 feet in Venezuela, March 1963.Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic

current state of humanity and the awakening

Lemon picking on my street 🍋

Lemon picking on my street 🍋

One Love

One Love

Blooming on my street🐝💞🌸

Blooming on my street🐝💞🌸

We Are Light

Set yourself free and remember that we are light beings, true liberation awaits…

I don’t think hip-hop so much reflects these violent neighborhoods, as it serves as therapy for the young boys who live in them. It offers a vicarious world where every puerile desire is instantly met. If you listen really closely to music, you will hear it pulsing with teenage insecurity and the angst of the youth. In hip-hop, young people are able to express sentiments and feelings, many of them negative, which they can’t really express elsewhere. Living, from the time you are born, with the threat of existential violence is stressful. Stress leads to anger and fear. We don’t generally express our anger and fear by saying, “I love the world” or “I pray for an end to world hunger.” Living around violence might make you say those things. But the stress of it more often will probably leave you with a string of curse words on your tongue. Moreover, it might even make you want to convert all of those negative feelings into a persona which can’t be killed by other males, which never feels rejection from females, and is generally free to engage all its hedonistic desires.
– Ta-Nehisi Coates (via iamhby)
uzowuru:

andre 3000

uzowuru:

andre 3000

(via iamhby)

beyonce:

Houston, Texas December 2013
Photographed by Rob Hoffman

beyonce:

Houston, Texas December 2013

Photographed by Rob Hoffman

We Are Light
"I don’t think hip-hop so much reflects these violent neighborhoods, as it serves as therapy for the young boys who live in them. It offers a vicarious world where every puerile desire is instantly met. If you listen really closely to music, you will hear it pulsing with teenage insecurity and the angst of the youth. In hip-hop, young people are able to express sentiments and feelings, many of them negative, which they can’t really express elsewhere. Living, from the time you are born, with the threat of existential violence is stressful. Stress leads to anger and fear. We don’t generally express our anger and fear by saying, “I love the world” or “I pray for an end to world hunger.” Living around violence might make you say those things. But the stress of it more often will probably leave you with a string of curse words on your tongue. Moreover, it might even make you want to convert all of those negative feelings into a persona which can’t be killed by other males, which never feels rejection from females, and is generally free to engage all its hedonistic desires."

About:

My name is Blaine Tabitha.
I admire all art forms.
Tumblr is where I come for inspiration.
;-)

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